I am the Noah of hyperlinks.

Products or services that include mental well-being as a feature:

  1. Seamless Relocation is at its heart a London-based personal relocation consultancy. But their USP is framed in the language of well-being: moving is "emotional," "overwhelming," and "stressful." Their goal is to make this transition as positive and smooth as possible for all concerned.
  2. The StressEraser is an iPod-like biofeedback and training device to induce meditative states.

The World Stress Map shows the boundaries of the tectonic plates. The Pacific plate is large, and the western Pacific a whole load more textured than I expected. All those drowned continents.

Games about something that are actually about something else:

  1. Audiosurf (mentioned previously) sent over a demo. Techno car racing tetris. It's fun like dancing, which is fun because moving at the same rhythm you're hearing kind of doublepluses the sensation.
  2. Over a decade ago, Endorfun kept you occupied with a simple cube-rolling game while you got a buzz from subliminal affirmations flashed on the screen.

(I love the world and the world loves me.)

I've called this "body-thinking" before: the kind of reading of the world we do non-mentally. Everything we do taps into different motivations, of course (the joy of watching things happen; the joy of putting things away neatly; plain old needing to), but Audiosurf and Endorfun seem different somehow: the ostensible aim of the game is really just an excuse to keep you busy while the real mental pay-off happens.

(I create joyous relationships.)

On the study of the natural laws of exceptions, 'pataphysics:

  1. From A survey of imaginary musical technologies: For some composers, the imagining and realisation of a new and unfamiliar music technology is integral to their music. I also like the Tubaharp.
  2. Collections and exhibitions of the Museum of Jurassic Technology, Culver City.


  1. Quotes from Tyler Durden.
  2. Spiritual messages printed on tea bags.

Two by two! Two by two!